October 29 , 2010
In this Issue

  1. New Guide to Building High-Quality Early Childhood State Systems
    Source: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices - Retrieved October 29, 2010
  2. Access to Education and Community Activities for Young Children with Disabilities
    Source: National Center for Special Education Research - October 27, 2010
  3. A Study of States' Monitoring and Improvement Practices Under the IDEA
    Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences - October 28, 2010
  4. DEC Position Statement on Cultural and Linguistic Diversity
    Source: Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood - Retrieved October 26, 2010
  5. Improving Mothers' Literacy Skills Boosts Children’s Achievement
    Source: National Institutes of Health - October 25, 2010
  6. Two New Videos from the Center for Early Literacy Learning
    Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - October 26, 2010
  7. Child Maltreatment 2008: Summary of Key Findings
    Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway - October 28, 2010
  8. Integrating Developmental Sciences Knowledge into Educator Preparation
    Source: National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education - Retrieved October 29, 2010
  9. Child Health USA 2010 Available Online
    Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration - Retrieved October 25, 2010
  1. New Guide to Building High-Quality Early Childhood State Systems
    Source: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices - Retrieved October 29, 2010

    The National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) recently published Building Ready States: A Governor's Guide to Supporting a Comprehensive, High-Quality Early Childhood State System (October 2010), which offers six policy strategies governors can use to build and nurture comprehensive, high-quality early childhood systems. It is available online at http://www.nga.org/files/live/sites/NGA/files/pdf/1010GOVSGUIDEEARLYCHILD.PDF

    Top of Page
  2. Access to Education and Community Activities for Young Children with Disabilities
    Source: National Center for Special Education Research - October 27, 2010

    The National Center for Special Education Research NCSER) has published a new report, Access to Educational and Community Activities for Young Children with Disabilities (October 2010), which finds that most kindergarteners with disabilities are educated in a regular education classroom. Based on data from the Pre-Elementary Education Longitudinal Study (PEELS), the report covers access to community activities and kindergarten classroom experiences for young children with disabilities and examines how access and participation in these activities may vary by child, family, and school district characteristics. For more information, see the report at: http://ies.ed.gov/ncser/pubs/20113000/pdf/20113000.pdf

    Top of Page
  3. A Study of States' Monitoring and Improvement Practices Under the IDEA
    Source: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences - October 28, 2010

    The Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has issued a new report, A Study of States' Monitoring and Improvement Practices Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (October 2010), which provides a description of the nature and scope of states' Part B and Part C monitoring systems. Data on 20 states' monitoring systems in 2004-05 and 2006-07 were collected during two site visits. The report describes states' approaches to monitoring and how states' monitoring systems and processes mapped onto a framework developed for the study. It is available at http://ies.ed.gov/ncser/pubs/20113001/pdf/20113001.pdf

    Top of Page
  4. DEC Position Statement on Cultural and Linguistic Diversity
    Source: Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood - Retrieved October 26, 2010

    The Council for Exceptional Children's Division for Early Childhood (DEC) recently released a position statement on cultural and linguistic diversity, entitled Responsiveness to ALL Children, Families, and Professionals: Integrating Cultural and Linguistic Diversity into Policy and Practice (September 2010). The position statement describes seven characteristics of responsive early childhood programs that honor the values and practices of families being served as well as of people providing the services. The full position statement, as well as an executive summary are available online at http://www.dec-sped.org/Professionals/Position_Statements_and_Concept_Papers

    Top of Page
  5. Improving Mothers' Literacy Skills Boosts Children’s Achievement
    Source: National Institutes of Health - October 25, 2010

    Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have found that programs to boost the academic achievement of children from low income neighborhoods might be more successful if they also provided adult literacy education to parents. The researchers based this conclusion on their finding that a mother's reading skill is the greatest determinant of her children's future academic success, outweighing other factors, such as neighborhood and family income. The analysis examined data on more than 3,000 families. To learn more, see the press release at http://www.nih.gov/news/health/oct2010/nichd-25.htm

    Top of Page
  6. Two New Videos from the Center for Early Literacy Learning
    Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - October 26, 2010

    The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has produced the following two new CELLvideos:

    • Literacy Rich Environments - Making Room for Literacy - For use by parents to create a literacy rich environment in the home by using ordinary materials and everyday home activities.
    • Books, Nooks, and Literacy Hooks - For use by practitioners to create a literacy rich early childhood setting as part of everyday classroom routines and activities.

    Both are available at http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/ta_pract_videos1.php. CELL is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Research to Practice Division and is a major initiative of the Center for Evidence-Based Practices at the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute.

    Top of Page
  7. Child Maltreatment 2008: Summary of Key Findings
    Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway - October 28, 2010

    A new fact sheet presents excerpts from Child Maltreatment 2008, a report based on data submissions by State child protective services (CPS) agencies for Federal fiscal year (FFY) 2008. It is available online at http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/factsheets/canstats.cfm. The full Child Maltreatment 2008 report is available online at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/pubs/cm08/

    Top of Page
  8. Integrating Developmental Sciences Knowledge into Educator Preparation
    Source: National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education - Retrieved October 29, 2010

    The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) has issued a new report, The Road Less Traveled: How the Developmental Sciences Can Prepare Educators to Improve Student Achievement (October 2010), which recommends better incorporating the developmental sciences into educator preparation programs. It is based on over 10 years of research demonstrating the importance teachers' understanding of social, emotional and cognitive development. It was prepared by a panel co-chaired by Dr. James P. Comer, founder of the Yale Child Study Center School Development Program, and Dr. Robert Pinata, dean of the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia. Links to the full report and summary reports can be found at http://www.ncate.org/dotnetnuke/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=gY3FtiptMSo%3D&tabid=706

    Top of Page
  9. Child Health USA 2010 Available Online
    Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration - Retrieved October 25, 2010

    Child Health USA 2010 (October 2010), published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, is now available online. This annual report provides graphical and textual summaries on the health status and service needs of America's children, covering over 50 health-related indicators. The information reflects the increasingly diverse population of children and families in the U.S., highlights emerging issues and trends, profiles children's health from a variety of data sources, serves as a concise reference for policy makers and program managers. It is available at http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov/chusa10/index.html

    Top of Page