January 20 , 2012
In this Issue

  1. 30 Year Follow-up Study Shows Benefits of High Quality Early Childhood Care and Education
    Source: Developmental Psychology - January 16, 2012
  2. Autism Speaks Invites Research Grant Applications
    Source: Autism Speaks - January 19, 2012
  3. State Early Care and Education Policy Developments: Fiscal Year 2012
    Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - Retrieved January 19, 2012
  4. Two New CELLpops for Practitioners to Help Promote Early Literacy Learning
    Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - January 19, 2012
  5. A Tool Using Data to Inform a State Early Childhood Agenda
    Source: CLASP - January 18, 2012
  6. PowerPoint Presentation on Early Childhood and AT
    Source: Family Center on Technology and Disability - Retrieved January 20, 2012
  1. 30 Year Follow-up Study Shows Benefits of High Quality Early Childhood Care and Education
    Source: Developmental Psychology - January 16, 2012

    On January 16, 2012, Developmental Psychology published new findings from the long-running, highly regarded Abecedarian Project, led by the FPG Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The findings show that adults who participated in the high quality early childhood education program in the 1970s are still benefitting in a variety of ways. For example, at age 30, Abecedarian Project participants had significantly more years of education than the control group and were four times more likely to have earned college degrees (23% of participants compared to only 6% of the control group). See the UNC News Release for a summary of additional findings.

    Full citation: Campbell, F. A., Pungello, E. P., Burchinal, M., Kainz, K., Pan, Y., Wasik, B. H., Barbarin, O. A., Sparling, J. J., & Ramey, C.T. (2012). Adult outcomes as a function of an early childhood educational program: An Abecedarian Project follow-up. Developmental Psychology, Jan 16, 2012. doi: 10.1037/a0026644

    Online access may require subscription, or you can purchase the article without subscription.

    You may also be interested in NECTAC's resource page on Effectiveness of Infant and Early Childhood Interventions.

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  2. Autism Speaks Invites Research Grant Applications
    Source: Autism Speaks - January 19, 2012

    On January 19, 2012, Autism Speaks launched its 2012 requests for grant applications in the areas of Treatment and Basic & Clinical research. In the treatment category, full- and pilot-level grant applications to conduct innovative studies of promising new interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are welcome. In the basic and clinical research category, full- and pilot-level grant applications to conduct innovative biomedical and behavioral research into the causes, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and dissemination of evidence-based practices for ASD are welcome. Additional information is available on the Autism Speaks - Research Grant Applications Web page.

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  3. State Early Care and Education Policy Developments: Fiscal Year 2012
    Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - Retrieved January 19, 2012

    The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) has published its annual brief of state policy developments related to early care and education. State Early Care and Education Policy Developments: Fiscal Year 2012 highlights selected enacted legislation; new initiatives approved by the state executive branch; major funding increases, decreases, or level-funding; and additional significant fiscal or policy changes that impact early childhood education.

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  4. Two New CELLpops for Practitioners to Help Promote Early Literacy Learning
    Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - January 19, 2012

    The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has released two new CELLpops for practitioners of preschoolers. CELLpops are interactive web versions of CELL mini-posters that include ideas for practitioners to promote children's early literacy learning. In the Blocks Center and In the Kitchen Center can be used by practitioners working with preschoolers to incorporate early literacy learning activities into their individual classroom centers. Both are available on the CELLpops and CELL mini posters Web page.

    CELL is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs' Research to Practice Division and is a major initiative of the Center for Evidence-Based Practices at the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute.

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  5. A Tool Using Data to Inform a State Early Childhood Agenda
    Source: CLASP - January 18, 2012

    CLASP has developed a new tool to help state policy makers better understand the context and conditions of young children, birth to six, in their state. A Tool Using Data to Inform a State Early Childhood Agenda (2012) includes a series of questions on how young children are faring on key indicators and provides links to online data sources that can be used to answer those questions. Once compiled, these data can be used to help develop a state early childhood agenda.

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  6. PowerPoint Presentation on Early Childhood and AT
    Source: Family Center on Technology and Disability - Retrieved January 20, 2012

    The Family Center on Technology and Disability (FCTD) recently posted a new PowerPoint presentation on their Web site entitled Early Childhood and AT. The presentation provides a range of assistive technology (AT) examples appropriate for young children and discusses issues to be considered when using AT with this age group.

    Permission to copy and distribute portions of the Power Point without prior consent is provided, as long as attribution is given to the FCTD, under U.S. Department of Education Grant H327F080003. The FCTD also has additional PowerPoint Presentations on Assistive Technology available on their Web site.

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